Top sustainable food blogs

Our top picks of the best sustainable food blogs:

Culinate

Culinate is a bit of foodie site, but with reflection on where our food comes from, how it is produced and the need to ‘fuse health, taste and the environment’ in our eating. The content is diverse and it has a wide range of notable food people writing columns. The recipes are fantastic!

New Potatoes in Sorrel Sauce

Deborah Madison, the seminal chef at Greens in San Francisco which transformed vegetarian cooking in the 1980s, is a regular writer at Culinate contributing fantastic recipes with commentary. Her latest is post is a divine combination of new potatoes and sorrel. Sorrel is an overlooked, and consequently, often difficult to find green. However, it has the most distinctive flavour and is well worth growing if there isn’t a good green grocer about. It’s often used raw in salads but can be intensely tart. Madison’s recipe uses raw sorrel but blends it into a sauce. Processing it by blending or by cooking softens the flavour. It’s a lovely addition to quiches and curries as well.

Food Democracy Now!

A campaign based organisation, Food Democracy Now is dedicated to building a sustainable food system ‘…that protects our natural environment, sustains farmers and nourishes families.’ It is an unabashedly activist organisation doing great things in the US. The blog carries a range of interesting and under the radar articles and news pieces and also include Food Democracy Now write-ups of its campaigns.

Tell the EPA to Keep glyphosate off your plate

Food Democracy Now’s latest campaign is focused once again on Monsanto (they recently put a lot of energy into raising awareness and gathering protest signatures against the ‘Monsanto Protection Act’). The US Environmental Protection Agency is raising the allowable level of chemical residue from glyphosate in many food crops. Given the omnipresence of glyphosate in our bodies – a report by Friends of the Earth found high traces of the chemical in the urine of European city dwellers in 18 countries – and the environment, do we really need more? The chemical, which is the key ingredient in Round-up, has been linked to a range of diseases, including, a recent MIT study asserted ‘gastrointestinal disorders, obesity, diabetes, heart disease, depression, autism, infertility, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.’

Food Nation

Based in Newcastle upon Tyne, Food Nation is an organisation devoted to ‘building healthier communities.’ They run cookery courses and food focused projects for schools and communities. The section to visit is the recipes with new ones posted each week. Lots of good home-spun comfort food and tips on what to do with different veg.

Food Politics

Food Nation’s daily blog written by Marion Nestle is topical and straight to the point. Food Nation is based in the States, so the focus is on issues impacting the food movement there. But what happens in the States often has a parallel here, so much of what she writes about is pertinent the UK. Nestle also does a great job of directing her audience to relevant source material – interviews, news items, other blogs, new publications, research. Always worth a scan for well thought through opinions and interesting items.

World Health Organisation takes on the food industry

This is a good example of the things that turn up on Nestle’s blog. Nestle excerpts some particularly salient points made by Dr. Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organisation. Chan is a woman who understands the power of big business in influencing public policy and her speech makes no bones about the problematics of addressing our critical health issue in the face of market interests. Chan bluntly states ‘…it is not just Big Tobacco anymore. Public health must also contend with Big Food, Big Soda,and Big Alcohol.’ The excerpt is a stunning read and Nestle accompanies it with a range of other related links.

Food Tank

Food Tank is dedicated to highlighting new thinking and research on a range of sustainable food issues – from hunger and obesity to climate change and agriculture. They post daily blogs on innovative projects, new research and news items along with a weekly ‘food hero’ piece, covering the globe.

Geoff Tansey

Tansy is a writer and consultant on sustainable food systems who writes very personally in his blog about his work. The content is mostly about where he’s travelling to in his work and writing, so there can be interesting coverage of agricultural practices, problems and research in different parts of the world.

Mark Bittman

Bittman is The New York Times Magazine’s lead food columnist and he publishes on both his blogspot and on the New York Times Opinionator. Very readable and smart writing on a wide range of food issues and news with a clear belief in sustainability.

Michael Pollan

Everyone’s favourite writer on food and sustainability. He doesn’t have a regular blogspot, but his website posts tweets in which he daily posts links to interesting and important articles, research and other documents.

Slow Food USA

Published weekly, this blog covers a range of initiatives, viewpoints, news and issue based pieces raising awareness of different aspects of the global food movement with a focus on the USA. Different writers are featured with some pieces written by Slow Food USA and others commissioned or reposted.

Sustaination

Sustaination’s tag line is ‘helping business trade sustainably.’ They see themselves as an interface sustainable businesses and consumers. In addition to the website, they run Food Trade, a business to business network and I Want Better Food which maps consumer demand and offers feedback to businesses. It posts a range of articles, materials and documents relevant to sustainable food. The site’s not the easiest to navigate for current information, but a lot of interesting stuff turns up.

Published on Sustainable Food Trust.

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